THE SIGNAL BOX

LEVER FRAMES

BRITISH RAILWAY LEVER FRAMES

Railway Signal Company lever frames

Railway Signal Company Tappet locking frameRailway Signal Company Tappet locking frame

The Railway Signal Company introduced this frame type in 1884. It was of straightforward and study construction, and rapidly became widespread.

They can be found with levers spaced at 4" or 5½". A distinct feature is the enormous catch handle.

These could be found on the Great Eastern, Great Northern, Lancashire & Yorkshire, Midland & Great Northern and Great Central Railways in quantity, and elsewhere. Variations were built for the London Tilbury & Southend and Furness companies.

This example is at Clayton West Junction, more details of which can be found in the Photo Gallery. Similar frames are illustrated at Caergwrle, Haxey, Hoylake, Milner Royd Junction and Ockendon (the LT&S variation)

Railway Signal Company lever frame for the Furness RailwayRailway Signal Company Tappet frame for the Furness Railway

The Furness Railway did not build its own lever frames - it bought in from external contractors, but in nearly all cases the designs varied from the standard product suggesting the Furness Railway specified certain details.

The largest number of frames came from the Railway Signal Company, and the most visible difference from their standard design is in the design of the catch-handle.

Similar frames were also built by other contractors, such as Saxby & Farmer.

The example is at Carnforth Station Junction, more details of which can be found in the Photo Gallery

Railway Signal Company - Great Northern Railway of Ireland pattern frameRailway Signal Company - Great Northern Railway of Ireland pattern frame

A different style of tappet frame was introduced in the 1930s for the Great Northern railway of Ireland.

A quantity of these frames were built for the Eastern Region of British Railways in the 1950's. The type was not used exclusively, so it is possible that these were actually an unfulfilled order from Ireland offloaded at a good price.

The levers stand nearer to upright and have a longer stroke which spreads the lever load.

This example is at Seymour Junction, more details of which can be found in the Photo Gallery. A similar frame is illustrated at Gainsborough Trent Junctions.

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