THE SIGNAL BOX

PHOTO GALLERY

GNR Somersault signal

Signal boxes built by
McKENZIE & HOLLAND

McKenzie & Holland (originally (McKenzie, Clunes & Holland) were one of the earliest signalling contractors, and supplied many railway companies around the country.

Please click on the thumbnail images for more information on each location.

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Leek Brook JunctionPage includes views of lever framePage includes views of signals and other outdoor equipment

The earliest designs of McKenzie & Holland box, used up to 1875 featured hipped roofs, with an area of plain woodwork between the windows and roof line. The box shown here was built for the North Staffordshire Railway.

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TalerddigPage includes views of signals and other outdoor equipment

This box, built for the Cambrian Railway, was originally to the same design as above. However, at some time the roof has been renewed in gabled style, perhaps as a result of fire damage.

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Hartlebury Station

A few boxes were built during 1875 with a deeper window area. These were three panes deep, although not obvious here as the top row have been painted out! This example was built for the Great Western Railway.

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Histon

Some standard boxes were provided for the Great Eastern Railway until 1878, but they also had many boxes built to their own specification. This is an example of the latter, which were easily identified by the lack of horizontal glazing bars in the windows. Standard McKenzie & Holland finials, as provided on signals, were fitted.

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Baschurch

In 1875, the design switched to gabled roofs, and this style of box continued to be built right through to 1921. Many boxes of this type had brick bases, with large, arched locking room windows. This box was built for the Great Western.

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Bargoed Pits

The Rhymney Railway had many examples of this style built from local stone.

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Ystrad Mynach SouthPage includes views of lever frame

Another Rhymney Railway box of the same design. This one was, unusually, elevated a short way up the embankment.

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Aylsham

Not all boxes built by McKenzie & Holland were provided with porches - this all-timber example on the East Norfolk Railway has an open landing

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Earls Colne

A brick and timber bpx of standard design was provided for the Colne Valley & Halstead Railway in 1882.

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Achnasheen EastPage includes views of lever framePage includes close-up views of box diagram

A variation of this design could be found on the Highland Railway's lines. These embodied vertical battened timber (local practice) and a smaller glazed area just two panes deep.

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Achnasheen WestPage includes views of lever frame

Another similar box on the Highland Railway. Boxes of this type were erected on this company's lines through to 1896.

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Forres EastPage includes views of lever frame

This example was erected for the Highland Railway in 1896.

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Dingwall SouthPage includes views of lever framePage includes close-up views of lever badgesPage includes close-up views if signalling instruments and equipment

The larger boxes built by McKenzie & Holland for the Highland Railway did feature the three-pane high windows of the standard product.

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Welsh's Bridge

A more ornate version of McKenzie & Holland's design for the Highland Railway was provided for the Inverness resignalling of 1897. These featured decorated bargeboards and curved framing at the top of the windows.

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Rhondda Fach Junction SouthPage includes views of lever frame

Boxes built for the Taff Vale Railway conformed basically to the 1875 design, but were provided with ornate bargeboards and a few other adornments. After 1893, larger panes of glass were incorporated in the window area, giving a less cluttered and more modern look.

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Walnut Tree JunctionPage includes views of signals and other outdoor equipment

Another box of the same type built for the Taff Vale. This example has been built with a two-story base to improve the signalman's view.

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Gyfeillon UpperPage includes views of lever frame

A smaller cabin of the same Taff Vale design, but built fully in timber. The low brick base may be a later addition to counteract rot or subsidence.

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Caerphilly EastPage includes views of lever frame

The largest cabin on the Rhymney Railway opened in 1913, but the architecture was pure McKenzie & Holland.

McKenzie & Holland were taken over by the Westingshouse Brake & Signal Company in 1920.