THE SIGNAL BOX

PHOTO GALLERY

GNR Somersault signal

Signal boxes built by
SAXBY & FARMER

Saxby and Farmer was one of the biggest signalling contractors, constructing a wide range of boxes over the years for a large number of railway companies.

Please click on the thumbnail images for more information on each location.

Visit the box

Horrocksford Junction

Early Saxby & Farmer boxes (built from 1857) were plain and unassuming, with a flush-fitting hipped roof. A large number of this type were erected around the country; this example is on the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway.

Visit the box

RuffordPage includes views of lever frame

The above design was developed to include an additional row of windows below the main section. Rufford is also on the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway.

Visit the box

Brierfield Station

Another example on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, this type featured yet more glazing to improve the signalman's view.

Visit the box

Billingshurst

An all-timber example of Saxby & Farmer's first design of box, on the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway. On many early examples, the lower storey was untimbered and exposed to the elements.

Visit the box

Troutbeck

Early boxes on the Cockermouth, Keswick & Penrith Railway were erected by Saxby & Farmer, to the same design.

Visit the box

Lambrigg Crossing

Boxes of this type were also erected on the London & North Western Railway.

Visit the box

Llysfaen

A larger box of the same type, constructed in blue "engineer's" brick, also on the London & North Western Railway.

Visit the box

Malden Crossing

The above design was enhanced in 1868 by the provision of small additional windows above the main glazing. This example, built for the London & South Western Railway has a brick base.

Visit the box

GunnersburyPage includes views of lever frame

Another box of the same type, built for the L&SW in 1869.

Visit the box

Torquay

This stone-based box, built for the South Devon Railway, has had its upper row of windows concealed by timber panelling at some time in its life.

Visit the box

Banbury Lane

Similar boxes were erected on the London & North Western Railway, although this particular example has had the roof renewed in gabled form at some time.

Visit the box

MitchamPage includes views of lever framePage includes close-up views if signalling instruments and equipmentPage includes views of signals and other outdoor equipment

A variation of the above type was provided for the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway. This had a small roof overhang, supported by carved wooden brackets.

Visit the box

Epsom Downs

An unusually large box of the above type was erected for the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway at Epsom Downs in 1879. Examples built after 1875 had decorative roof brackets beneath the eaves.

Visit the box

Stoke Canon Crossing

Boxes of this type were also erected by Saxby & Farmer on the Bristol & Exeter Railway's lines.

Visit the box

DraytonPage includes views of lever frame

The most common and attractive design of Saxby & Farmer was introduced in 1876, creating a more handsome design by providing a greater overhang on the roof, and decorative curves on the window frames. Large numbers of this type were built around the country. This example was one of the first of many built for the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway.

Visit the box

Boston Road

Another example of the 1876 design, on the Metropolitan District Railway.

Visit the box

Farningham RoadPage includes views of lever frame

The London, Chatham & Dover Railway had many examples of the 1876 architecture.

Visit the box

Clayton West Station

Boxes of this type were erected on the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway with an additional row of windows below the main set, starting a change that the L&Y subsequently perpetuated in other designs.

Visit the box

Navigation Road

A similar box on the Manchester South Junction and Altrincham Railway. The additional set of windows have more recently been pained over.

Visit the box

Longhedge JunctionPage includes views of lever framePage includes close-up views if signalling instruments and equipment

The London, Brighton & South Coast Railway continued to use the 1876 design right through to 1898, although Saxby & Farmer replaced this type with other, simpler designs, in 1884.

Visit the box

Bearsted

This was the first design of box with a gabled roof, introduced in 1884 but only found on the South Eastern and Hull & Barnsley networks. This was basically a gabled version of 1876 design but was soon superseded by a more attractive design, below.

Visit the box

RyePage includes views of lever framePage includes close-up views if signalling instruments and equipment

Another gabled roof design was introduced later in 1884, and a large number of these were supplied to various companies. This example was constructed for the South Eastern Railway.

Visit the box

Coombe Junction

Some boxes of the second 1884 design had smaller windows and less roof overhang. This example, on the Liskeard & Looe Railway, was one of the last Saxby & Farmer boxes ever built.

Visit the box

Sandown

Similar boxes were erected on the Isle of Wight Railway during the 1890s.

Saxby & Farmer later merged with a number of other contractors to become the Westinghouse Brake & Saxby Signal Company. No further box designs were developed as all new installations were boxes of the railways companies' own styles.