Cambus Junction

PHOTO GALLERY: NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY

Cambus Junction

OPENED: 1903      CLOSED: 1987

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The North British Railway introduced their first standardised design around 1873 – it featured distinct heavy-looking brick construction and sash windows.

Cambus Junction SB
John Hinson, 1981

Cambus Junction is a fairly large example (a more typical size was about half this length) and was also one of the last examples of the design to be built. A rare timber equivalent of the type is illustrated at Thornton North.

Cambus Junction was to be found on the Dunfermline to Stirling route, used only for freight after 1968. It had been the junction for the Alva branch and was the second signal box at this location. The yard facilities were enlarged here during World War II and a 50-lever frame replaced the original 40-lever one. And in 1957, another new lever frame was provided, with 55-levers, as freight traffic (mainly coal) continued to develop in the area.

Cambus Junction SB
John Hinson, 1981

This photograph shows the 1955 frame in the signal box – most lever frames of the BR era in Scotland had white plastic sleeves fitted to the lever handles which certainly gave a neat appearance. At the far end of the box, the size of the sash windows demonstrates how the brick pillars don’t impose enough to restrict the light. The gate wheel that works the level crossing gates can be seen.

The line towards Alloa was taken out of use in 1985 and the signal box was abolished on 20th December 1987. Interestingly, the line re-opened as a through route in 2008.

 

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