Skinner Street Junction

PHOTO GALLERY: NORTH LONDON RAILWAY

Skinner Street Junction

OPENED: 1892     CLOSED: 1970

Click or tap the images for enlarged views

Skinner Street Junction was the “master” signal box controlling access to and from the North London Railway’s city terminus at Broad Street. Architecturally it is odd!

Skinner Street Junction SB
Dr J W F Scrimgeour, 7/61

The signal box opened in 1892 but it has a flat roof making it look distinctly post-war. It is tempting to suggest it has suffered fire damage but the photograph below of 1905 rather disproves that.

Skinner Street Junction SB
Railway Gazette, 1905

Close study of this photograph shows the rafters to be in the same position as in 1961 (below) and rather than being completely flat they were actually slightly sloped towards the running lines – not a bad idea to point rainwater in that direction, otherwise passengers on Platform 1 at Liverpool Street might have had something to say!

Skinner Street Junction SB
Dr J W F Scrimgeour, 7/61

Not a lot seems to have changed by 1961, but this high-quality image reveals more detail. 82 levers of the 84-lever NLR Tumbler frame are visible here. Above them are a range of instruments, right to left:

  • A Pryce & Ferriera block instrument (accepting only) for the Goods Arrival Line from New Inn Yard
  • A Tyer & Co rotary train describer receiving instrument
  • A Pryce & Ferreira double-line block instrument for signalling trains on the No2 Lines to/from New Inn Yard box.
  • A bank of platform instruments to control trains between here and Broad Street No2 (see below)

A corresponding bank of instruments for the No1 lines exist at the far end of the shelf.

Skinner Street Junction SB
Dr J W F Scrimgeour, 7/61

With these instruments, the Skinner Street Junction signalman basically told the signalman at Broad Street No2 “where to stick ’em” and that box really had little freedom to do anything else as all running signals were slotted between the two boxes. Likewise, departing trains were controlled by Skinner Street Junction because each platform starting signal slot was controlled by separate levers.

More detail on the operation of these instruments is described in the Give My Regards to Broad Street article.

Skinner Street Junction was abolished with the removal of the No1 Lines and general rationalisation of signalling in the area on 15th February 1970.

 

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